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                                         Class of 2021 Slideshow

*This slideshow only contains slides of students who expressed interest in being featured on our website, it does not reflect the entire Psychology Department graduating class.

News

June 07, 2021

Professor Daphna Shohamy named Kavli Professor of Brain Science, and Co-Director of the Kavli Institute for Brain Science

Professor Daphna Shohamy was recently appointed to the Kavli Professorship of Brain Science and was also named as a co-director of the Kavli Institute for Brain Science. Dr. Shohamy’s research focuses on understanding the process of learning, as well as the neurobiological and cognitive mechanisms of memory and decision making. The Kavli Professorship was previously held by Dr. Eric Kandel, who, along with Dr.

June 01, 2021

Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee's Statement and Report on DEI-related activities in our Department over the past year

The tragic murder of George Floyd happened one year ago this week.  His death followed and was preceded by the deaths of countless other black men and women at the hands of police.  In the wake of this tragedy last year, members of the Columbia University Psychology Department sent a letter asking, “what can we do now – as individuals, a department, a university, an academic discipline – to contribute to making Black Lives Matter in reality rather than simply in rhetoric.” To begin the conversation, they highlighted areas of focus for meaningful change, which we reference throughout this do

Featured Videos

This short film, from an anthology created by Science Friday and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), follows women working at the forefront of their fields. This episode features new Assistant Professor Bianca Jones Marlin.
The Psychology PhD Podcast S01Ep01.

Publications

Needed Interventions to Reduce Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Health

David R. Williams
Valerie Purdie-Vaughns

Can Only One Person Be Right? The Development of Objectivism and Social Preferences Regarding Widely Shared and Controversial Moral Beliefs

Larisa Heiphetz